Celestial Newsletter

Plan for Video of a Black Hole

Plan for Video of a Black Hole

In April 2019, scientists published the first-ever image captured of a black hole called M87. Now, the same team of scientists are planning to capture video footage of this phenomenon. Scientists are hoping to see M87 in action, devouring a star. Video footage of a black hole will help scientists to better understand their nature and allow them to test Einstein’s gravity.
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Space sound inspiration

Space sound inspiration

‘Ad Astra’ writer and director, James Gray, listened to space sounds while creating his celestial world. The director created a playlist of sounds, which he listened to while writing the film. The sounds of space can be captured by converting electromagnetic waves into sound waves. 
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Black Spot on Jupiter

Black Spot on Jupiter

NASA’s solar-powered spacecraft, Juno, recently captured images of a 2,200-mile-long black spot on the surface of Jupiter. What some thought was a never before seen phenomenon actually turned out to be the shadow of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Lo, eclipsing the sun.
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Stellar lighting

Stellar lighting

British designer Lee Broom presented a range of outer-space-inspired lighting inside a listed building during last year's Milan design week.

"[It is] Lee Broom's most progressive work to date with new stellar-inspired designs playing with proportions of vertical and horizontal space, sculptural, spherical form, and the refraction and reflection of light."

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NASA artifacts

NASA artifacts

British photographer Benedict Redgrove has taken photographs of numerous artifacts within the NASA archive. To mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, he has picked out his favorites.
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Dying Star's Colorful Demise

Dying Star's Colorful Demise

In the Gemini constellation - This cosmic region is so complicated that when astronomers first turned their attention to it years ago, they recorded two objects there because there is a symmetrical lobed structure visible there. Today, we know that there is only a single object. Still, in deference to older naming conventions, the region is often known as NGC 2371/2 — a combination of the two older names: NGC 2371 and NGC 2372.
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